Recipes

Recipe: Cauliflower Couscous

Now, we’re the first ones to admit we enjoy food, we don’t call ourselves the greedy sisters for nothing! But we have also learned (sometimes the hard way) the necessary art of moderation.

Next week it’s my birthday and an early Easter follows, so this weekend marks the first many, many celebratory meals. In preparation for the impending gluttony I’m trying to have light meals where possible, but that doesn’t mean they have to be dull.

Yesterday I decided to try a new dish I’ve seen crop up in a few health food blogs recently; cauliflower couscous. There are many variations, but here’s how I did mine…

Serves 2-4

Cauliflower couscous with spring onions, chilli and lemon zest

Ingredients:

1 whole cauliflower

drizzle of light olive oil

freshly ground black pepper

sea salt flakes

topping:

half a red chilli, finely sliced

1 spring onion, finely sliced

grated zest of ½ a lemon

Method;

1. Roughly chop the raw cauliflower into small florets, discarding the leaves and greenery

2. Blitz the cauliflower in a food processor until it starts to resemble grains of couscous. You might need to do this in batches so you don’t over-fill the processor; and don’t over-whizz it as you don’t want the cauliflower to turn to mush!

3. Heat a splash of olive oil in a large frying pan and add the cauliflower

4. Stir so each ‘grain’ gets coated in a little bit of oil and fry gently for around 5 minutes – you don’t need it to brown, just soften slightly

5. Take off the heat and season really well with salt and pepper, fluffing with a fork as you go along.

Done!

Variations:

At this point you can really decide what you want to add for flavour; I went for a sprinkling of lightly fried spring onion, chilli and lemon zest.

For dinner that evening I used the couscous to stuff a roast pepper and topped it with crumbled feta, baking in the oven for 15-20 mins. I also had plenty left over to mix with salad for lunch the next day.

You could experiment with various dressings, herbs and toppings, or use the couscous as an accompaniment to a meat or fish dish.

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